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Star Menu Workshops & Residencies Mythic Dance Cycles Allegory Of The Cranes jiibayaabooz: Light In The Underworld Indigenous Choreographers Conference

Artistic Director No Home But The Heart Workshops & Residencies Mythic Dance Cycles jiibayaabooz: Light In The Underworld

 

DAYSTAR:
WORKSHOPS AND RESIDENCIES

WORKSHOP SERIES of 1-3 days
EXTENDED RESIDENCY of 1-3 weeks

SEMESTER-LENGTH RESIDENCIES of 1-3 months

Customized for your learning group as one of these content-specific titles listed below.

 

 

 

   
   

ATTENDING A POWWOW AT SALISH-KOOTENAI, ARLEE, MONTANA (2007)

 

   
   

Traditional Women's Ragalia

Traditional Women's Ragalia

Powwow Event

Grand Entry (women's traditional)

Daystar Sitting

A Break Between Dances

   
   

Today’s “powwow” has developed in North America over the last hundred years. The dances we see today come from a variety of origins, from the dances of various tribal men’s and women’s Societies, to the concept of public dance display made popular in the early Wild West shows.  Make no mistake about it, today’s “powwow” is a celebration on many levels: a gathering of Nations, a dance participation for enjoyment or competition, a popular public event, a spiritual practice. Because of the welcoming attitude of Indigenous peoples, anyone can join in the general Intertribal. The Arena Director will announce “Everybody dance!”  Dance regalia is not required; the dance is communal and celebratory, danced for enjoyment and health.  The step is as simple as “keeping in step” with the Drum.

   
   

 

   
         
 
   


 

 

 

   
   

gif INDIGENOUS (NORTH AMERICAN) DANCE, SONG AND CULTURE gif
(participation in intertribal dance and song)

 

   
   

 

Traditional
Traditional
Jingle
Jingle
     
   

ShawlShawl

Round Dance
Round Dance

Hoop
Hoop

   
   

Workshop participants will be given a short introduction to the purposes of dance and song within Indigenous (North American) societies.  As dances are explained and experienced, I give ongoing comments on the historical or tribal context for the dances and songs. The workshop always begins with the “Round Dance”, in which the participants learn the two basic steps, each with a slightly different rhythm. The basic dance quality of the “pulsation” is also learned here. The dance teaching continues from simple to more complex, and the content will be determined by the time allotted to the workshop. Most of the dances are Intertribal dance forms (Plains and Woodland Regions), with some “animal dances” and “story dances” from other regions of the United States and Canada. Recorded drum songs will be used as needed.  I use a hand drum to accompany dance teaching and appropriate dance sequences. Some dance accessories will be supplied for student use, such as shawls for the Shawl Dance and ribbons/handkerchiefs for the Grass Dance.

 

INTERTRIBAL DANCES

Round Dance
Two-Step (Owl or Rabbit) Dance
Intertribal Dances:
Women’s Traditional Dance
Men’s Traditional Dance
Shawl Dance (women’s dance)
Grass Dance (men’s dance)
The Hoop Dance

 

THE ANIMAL AND STORY DANCES

Fish Dance (Menominee)
Mosquito Song and Dance (Cherokee)
Snake Dance (Great Lakes)
Duck Dance (Iroquois)

   
   

 

gif NATIVE AMERICAN DANCE GUIDELINES gif

   
   

 

 

   
               
   

gif THE MASKED DANCE JOURNEY: gif
BUILDING AN INDIGENOUS STORY WITH MASK
(mask-making and theatre training leading to production)

 

   
    Buffalo and Deer Emerging from the Four Directions
Buffalo and Deer Emerging from the Four Directions
   
    A Blackfeet Napi Story
A Blackfeet Napi Story
Use of the Neutral Mask in Class
Use of the Neutral Mask in Class
Link to Larger Image
Defining Character through Mask
Defining Character through Mask
   
   

The Masked Dance Journey requires a series of workshops over one to two weeks, during which an Indigenous story will be selected or created from within the participants of the workshop. Through the story, one gradually becomes familiar with the Indigenous cultural elements of the story and how these characters can be expressed in movement, song, character voice and word. Only then can scene work begin. In two weeks, working with  two to three sessions a day, a successful Indigenous Masked Story can be brought to performance. Three weeks would give even more time to enhance and expand  every element of the Journey: mask, movement, voice, costuming, sound, and scene sequencing.

Day One:  Find the Story
Day Two/Three: Design and make the Masks
Day Three/Four:  Discover the character
Day Five:  Develop the Scenes
Second Week:  Movement, Singing and Voice Training, Costuming, Sound Creation
Last Day, Second Week: Performance of the Indigenous Masked Story

A one or two day workshop can be designed to explore the elements of an Indigenous Masked Story, as time permits.  A compelling, educational and culturally relevant experience would be possible in this time period. Suitable for ages 10 through adult.

 

 

   
   

gif SPECIALIZED DANCE/THEATRE EXPERIENCES gif

TEACHER TRAINING

Training for the Teacher in Contemporary Indigenous Research and Production

Evoking Memories
A workshop for adults and mature teens in exploration of family history.
Material objects will be used as a source for finding story that can be
realized through movement, writing, storytelling, music and visual art

CONTACT DAYSTAR FOR MORE INFORMATION

   
     
               
   

 

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NEED A CONSULTANT FOR NATIVE AMERICAN PRODUCTION?

*DAYSTAR is available to contract as a consultant/advisor
to those interested in the
appreciation, training, and development of
Native American performing art expressions,
Including the full range of
music, dance, movement, acting, and production techniques.

 

Daystar is currently teaching at:

Indigenous Studies Department
1600 W. Bank Drive
Enweying Bldg, FPHL Rm#324
Trent University
Peterborough, Ontario K9J 7B8, Canada

Office:  705-748-1011 x7921

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For more information, contact Daystar at:

1473-6 Stowell Dr.
Rochester, NY 14616
Ph: 585-621-2813 / Fax: 585-865-0447

Email: daystardance@gmail.com

 

   
 

 

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